SERMONS

All of the sermon audio here comes from the Wesleyan and Pentecostal traditions, which focus on the work of the Holy Spirit in personal holiness. Just click on the pictures or links in the text to listen.

joseph-alleineJoseph Alleine (d. 1668), out of all of the Puritans, probably had the strongest impact on John Wesley and the early Methodists. Although Wesley read the writings of many different Anglicans and Puritans, Alleine’s Alarm to the Unconverted was a power packed Gospel presentation and was recommended reading for the Methodist preachers. After being ejected in 1662, Alleine went and traveled about preaching, and being imprisoned, with his friend John Westley (d. 1678), the grandfather of Wesley.

John Bunyan (d. 1688)John Bunyan (d. 1688) was perhaps the most popular and prolific of all the Puritan writers. He was a commoner, not a highly educated theologian. He was a Reformed Baptist, but he shunned titles; he was an open air preacher; he was a house church leader; he was imprisoned as a Nonconformist for many years where wrote his books, the most well known being The Pilgrim’s Progress. Click the picture for audio.

Richard Baxter (d. 1691)Richard Baxter (d. 1691) exerted a great theological influence on Wesley, as an Arminian, as a preacher of Biblical holiness, and as a cautious charismatic, Baxter presents some of the loveliest, most caustic, zealous, and direct preaching subjects. As a “neonomian” he firmly adhered to lordship salvation; and he firmly contended for obedience to the moral law in the Christian life. Regarding church government, he held the Presbyterian view; but he saw value in other Puritan types. He held three pastorates, the third of which was in Kidderminster, which was one of the first revivals in the Puritan tradition. He was ejected in 1662 and had an on-off ministry of house churches (conventicles) and imprisonments. Click here for some recordings of his writings.

George Fox (d. 1691)George Fox (d. 1691), founder of the Society of Friends (Quakers), the first overtly Puritan charismatic church after the Covenanters. Fox was also an Arminian and he believed strongly in prevenient grace: that the Holy Spirit was everywhere, drawing all men from the heathen world to know the Gospel of Christ: and that experientially, by that inward light of the Spirit which we call the conscience (John 1:9). He was not a universalist, as some mistake him to be. Click the picture for an audio version of his Autobiography. He wrote, “I was to bring people off from all the world’s religions, which are vain, that they might know the pure religion.” The Society of Friends were the first Protestant church to practice Christian contemplation as a central part of their faith.

John WesleyJohn Wesley (d. 1791) (d. 1791), founder of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was a circuit rider and open air preacher for most of his life. He was also a Church of England man; and it was only because of the lukewarmness of the clergy that he felt compelled by the Holy Spirit, and the urging of his friend George Whitefield, to begin open air preaching. Wesley took this apostolic style of evangelism very seriously. A brief look at his written sermons, the substance of which he memorized, will show that this zealous Bible scholar was very devout and educated, and one of the most successful revivalists and evangelists in church history. The Works of John Wesley laid the theological foundation for evangelical Arminianism; and for Methodist, Wesleyan, holiness, and Pentecostal churches.

Charles Finney (d. 1875), the leader of the Second Great Awakening in the state of New York, and leader of the holiness movement. Although he rejected original sin, most of what he says agrees with Wesleyan theology. He and his colleague Asa Mahan began to familiarize holiness people with The Baptism of the Holy Ghost and The Enduement of Power (1872) as a felt presence of God for entire sanctification. This teaching paved the way for the Azusa Street Revival.

Smith WigglesworthSmith Wigglesworth (d. 1947), the leading healing evangelist of early Pentecostalism, had backgrounds in the Church of England, the Salvation Army, and the Plymouth Brethren. After he was baptized in the Holy Spirit with the evidence of speaking in tongues, he remained an independent Wesleyan Pentecostal healing evangelist. His sermons were transcribed and preserved in Smith Wigglesworth: The Complete Collection of His Life Teachings. Another well known collection on miraculous gifts is his Ever Increasing Faith, for which the audio is attached to this picture. To this day, he is the most revered saint in Pentecostal and charismatic churches, and seen as a model of full Pentecostal potential.

Leonard RavenhillLeonard Ravenhill (d. 1994), the leading Wesleyan holiness revivalist of the 20th century, known for his book Why Revival Tarries. His mother and father were devout old-school Methodists; and did ministry with the Salvation Army. In his younger days, he was part of a home missions group called the Trekkers, who traveled around England on foot, open air preaching, and holding tent revivals. Together they founded the Calvary Holiness Church, which eventually merged with the Church of the Nazarene. All his life he remained open but cautious about speaking in tongues, along with his friend A. W. Tozer, the leader of the Christian & Missionary Alliance. He had a tremendous impact on evangelical and charismatic leaders, including David Wilkerson (Times Square Church), Keith Green (Last Days Ministries), Steve Hill (the Brownsville Revival), John Wimber (the Vineyard), Mike Bickle (IHOP), and even Southern Baptists like Charles Stanley and Paul Washer. Since 2002, the website sermonindex.net has drawn the attention of Millennials to Ravenhill, Wilkerson, and Washer; and now their sermons have a tremendous web presence.

David WilkersonDavid Wilkerson (d. 2011), founder of Teen Challenge, World Challenge, and Times Square Church, was arguably the greatest conservative Pentecostal evangelist, pastor, and prophetic voice in the past 50 years. He remained a licensed Assemblies of God preacher for most of his ministry, but functioned like an independent evangelist. In 1962, he published The Cross and the Switchblade, which told the story about his inner city ministry to gang members and drug addicts. Although he wrote books for most of his life, this one book was so influential that it opened up doors for ministry until almost the time of his death. Along with Ravenhill, he carried on the tradition of Wesleyan holiness preaching, and cried out against the sins of the world and the church; and he also preached many Biblical messages on encouragement and prayer. In 1973, he published The Vision, which shared prophecies about very specific trials soon coming to the body of Christ in America, many of which have already been fulfilled.

mike-bickleMike Bickle (b. 1955), founder of the International House of Prayer (IHOP-KC); as father of the “prophetic movement,” he was responsible for bringing the Kansas City prophets to notoriety within the Vineyard and rejuvenated “prophetic ministry” with words of knowledge in charismatic churches. In 1996, he published Growing in the Prophetic, which provides guidance for such a ministry to be used in a church.

Paul Washer (b. 1961), founder of HeartCry Missionary Society, well known for his online sermon titled “Shocking Youth Message,” among others, and his soteriology books The Gospel’s Power and Message, The Gospel Call and True Conversion, and Gospel Assurance and Warnings. He is a strong preacher of holiness and lordship salvation, was influenced by Ravenhill, and due to his online influence, has brought a degree of true revival in the evangelical churches. Although he is a Southern Baptist, he is very Puritan about his emphasis on Biblical sanctification, the use of the law, the atonement, and has frequently pointed out the weaknesses that exist in his denomination. And although he occasionally preaches a Calvinistic eternal security, and has some anti-charismatic views, Wesley would probably see him as a friend to all who truly love Christ.

Andrew StromAndrew Strom (b. 1971), founder of RevivalSchool.com, is an established Pentecostal revivalist from New Zealand. He is a student of revivals and was involved as a journalist in the prophetic movement for ten years. Andrew has been a much needed voice of spiritual discernment for Pentecostal and charismatic Christians. His focus is very similar to that of Leonard Ravenhill and Charles Finney: to preach repentance and Biblical holiness, but also to encourage the proper use of the miraculous gifts of the Spirit today. His videos on YouTube have had a far reaching impact in exposing kundalini manifestations in the New Apostolic Reformation (the prophetic movement); and his books, although controversial, are desperately needed, and we pray that you would be blessed by them: Kundalini Warning, True and False Revival, Why I Left the Prophetic Movement, The Sinner’s Prayer: Fact or Fiction?, and others. He also has some great sermons on video and audio and some on sermonindex.net.

Pic2John Boruff (b. 1985), founder of WesleyGospel.com, is a husband, father, musician, and sometimes an open air preacher. He graduated from UNC Pembroke in 2008 with a B.A. in Philosophy and Religion and views himself as a Baptistic Pentecostal. As a Christian, he feels connected with all members of the body of Christ, but can identify the most with churches like Assemblies of God and IHOP-KC. In 2015, he released The Gospel of Jesus Christ, which is meant to be a Bible study for open air preaching. For his other writings, search articles on this site or see the E-Books section.

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