SERMONS

All of the sermon audio here comes from the Puritan, Wesleyan, and Pentecostal traditions, which focus on the Gospel, personal holiness, and the work of the Holy Spirit. Just click on the pictures or links in the text to listen.

Image result for joseph alleine Joseph Alleine (d. 1668), out of all of the Puritans, probably had the strongest impact on John Wesley. Although Wesley read the writings of many different Anglicans and Puritans, Alleine’s An Alarm to the Unconverted (1672) was a powerful Gospel presentation and recommended reading for Methodist preachers. He earned a Bachelors of Divinity from Oxford University. After being ejected from his pastorate in 1662, Alleine traveled around preaching with Wesley’s grandfather, joining him in prison at times. The Alarm could have been the first plain example of a repentance-oriented lordship salvation Gospel presentation within Puritanism to have an impact not only in later Baptist and Presbyterian circles, but also in the Methodist Church. It was required reading for the early Methodist preachers.

John Bunyan (d. 1688)

John Bunyan (d. 1688) was perhaps the most popular and prolific of all the Puritan writers. He was a commoner, not a highly educated theologian. He was a Reformed Baptist, but he shunned titles; he was an open air preacher; he was a house church leader; he was imprisoned as a Nonconformist for many years where wrote his books, the most well known being The Pilgrim’s Progress (1678). He also wrote on a lot of practical subjects, like Baxter did, with titles such as A Few Sighs from Hell (1658), The Doctrine of the Law and Grace Unfolded (1659), The Resurrection of the Dead, and Eternal Judgment (1665), The Strait Gate: or, The Great Difficulty of Going to Heaven (1676), The Fear of God (1679), The Barren Fig-Tree: or, The Doom and Downfall of the Fruitless Professor (1682), The Holy War (1682), A Discourse Upon the Pharisee and the Publican (1685), and Of Antichrist and His Ruin (1692). Click the picture for audio.

Richard Baxter (d. 1691)

Richard Baxter (d. 1691) exerted a great theological influence on Wesley, as an Arminian, as a preacher of Biblical holiness, and as a cautious charismatic, Baxter presents some of the most practical, caustic, zealous, and direct subjects: Aphorisms of Justification (1649), The Reformed Pastor (1656), A Call to the Unconverted (1658, similar to Alleine’s), A Christian Directory (1673), Catholic Theology (1675), and later what were published as his Practical Works. As a “neonomian” he firmly adhered to lordship salvation; and contended for obedience to the moral law, often writing against antinomianism. He held three pastorates, the third of which was in Kidderminster, which was one of the first revivals in the Puritan tradition. He was ejected in 1662 and had an on-and-off ministry with house churches, and imprisonments. Click here for some recordings of his writings.

John Wesley (d. 1791)

John Wesley (d. 1791), founder of the Methodist Episcopal Church, was a circuit rider and open air preacher for most of his life. He was a Church of England man; and it was only because of the lukewarmness of the clergy that he felt compelled by the Holy Spirit, and the urging of his friend George Whitefield, to begin open air preaching. Wesley took this apostolic style of evangelism seriously. A brief look at his written sermons, most of which he memorized, will show that this zealous Bible scholar was very devout and educated, and one of the most successful revivalists and evangelists in church history. The Works of John Wesley laid the theological foundation for evangelical Arminianism; and for Methodist, Wesleyan, holiness, and Pentecostal churches.

Adam ClarkeAdam Clarke (d. 1832), the theological successor of Wesley, authored his Commentary on the Bible (1826), which rivals John Gill’s in its comprehensive approach, but instead provides Arminian answers to perplexing questions in Scripture. He also wrote Christian Theology (1835), which I think is great for Bible study, evangelistic preaching, and catechism. It provides a presentation of early Methodist soteriology.

Charles FinneyCharles Finney (d. 1875), the leader of the Second Great Awakening in the state of New York, and leader of the holiness movement. Although he rejected original sin, most of what he says agrees with Wesleyan theology. He and his colleague Asa Mahan began to familiarize holiness people with The Baptism of the Holy Ghost and The Enduement of Power (1872) as a felt presence of God for entire sanctification. This teaching paved the way for the Azusa Street Revival. In a way, Finney was kind of like the second Wesley. Often you will see the names of Wesley and Finney cited together, because their theology was so similar, and their Arminian emphasis on personal obedience to the Bible, and practical godliness was at the center of their writing and preaching.

Smith Wigglesworth
Smith Wigglesworth (d. 1947), the leading healing evangelist of early Pentecostalism, had a background in the Church of England, the Salvation Army, and some other churches. After he was baptized in the Holy Spirit with the evidence of speaking in tongues, he remained an independent Wesleyan Pentecostal healing evangelist. His sermons were transcribed and preserved in Smith Wigglesworth: The Complete Collection of His Life Teachings. Another well known collection on miraculous gifts is his Ever Increasing Faith, for which the audio is attached to this picture. To this day, he is the most revered saint in Pentecostal and charismatic churches, and seen as a model of full Pentecostal potential.

Leonard RavenhillLeonard Ravenhill (d. 1994), from Leeds, England, was the leading Wesleyan holiness revivalist of the 20th century, and was mainly known for his book Why Revival Tarries (1959). But he also authored other books through Bethany House Publishers: A Treasury of Prayer (1961, an E. M. Bounds compilation), Meat for Men (1979), America Is Too Young to Die (1979), Sodom Had No Bible (1981), Revival Praying (1981), Tried and Transfigured (1982), and Revival God’s Way (1986). His parents were devout Wesleyan Methodists; and did street ministry with the early Salvation Army during the time of William Booth. In his younger days, he was part of a home missions group called the Trekkers, who traveled around England on foot, open air preaching, and holding tent revivals. Together they founded the Calvary Holiness Church, which eventually merged with the Church of the Nazarene. All his life he remained open but cautious about speaking in tongues, along with his friend A. W. Tozer, the leader of the Christian & Missionary Alliance. He had a tremendous impact on evangelical and charismatic leaders, including David Wilkerson, Keith Green, Steve Hill and Michael L. Brown (the Brownsville Revival), John Wimber (the Vineyard), Mike Bickle (IHOP), and Paul Washer (HeartCry). Since 2002, the website sermonindex.net has drawn the attention of Millennials to Ravenhill, Wilkerson, and Washer; and now their sermons have a widespread web presence. A few pastors today in charismatic churches, the CMA, the AG, the Vineyard, and the Southern Baptist Convention are still Ravenhill fans.

David Wilkerson

David Wilkerson (d. 2011), founder of Teen Challenge, World Challenge, and Times Square Church, was arguably the greatest conservative Pentecostal evangelist, pastor, and prophetic voice in the past 50 years. He remained a licensed Assemblies of God preacher for most of his ministry, but functioned like an independent evangelist. In 1962, he published The Cross and the Switchblade, which told the story about his inner city ministry to gang members and drug addicts. Although he wrote books for most of his life, this one book was so influential that it opened up doors for ministry until almost the time of his death. Along with Ravenhill, he carried on the tradition of Wesleyan holiness preaching, and cried out against the sins of the world and the church; and he also preached many Biblical messages on encouragement and prayer. In 1973, he published The Vision, which shared prophecies about very specific trials soon coming to the body of Christ in America, many of which have already been fulfilled.

Steve HillSteve Hill (d. 2014), the evangelist who led the Brownsville Revival from 1995 to 2000 at Brownsville Assembly of God in Pensacola, Florida, was a spiritual son of Leonard Ravenhill and David Wilkerson. He was formerly a drug addict who got saved during the Jesus Movement under the ministry of Teen Challenge. He attended Wilkerson’s Bible school during the Lindale, Texas revival nearby Keith Green’s Last Days Ministries around 1979 to 1982. It is my personal belief that Hill was Ravenhill’s successor as a revivalist; and that the Brownsville Revival was the answer to years of Ravenhill’s intercessory prayers for national awakening in America. It is reported that 4 million people attended over the course of 5 years. In my view, it is the most recent national evangelical and conservative Pentecostal revival that America has seen; and should be considered on the same level as the Great Awakenings and the Azusa Street Revival. SteveHill.org preserves his video sermons called The Legacy Library which are available to members for a small fee. However, “bootleg” versions on YouTube are still out there. There are also a few audio sermons on SermonIndex. Named after his most well known sermon, White Cane Religion (1997) was published at the height of the revival’s popularity–the same year that The New York Times did an article about Brownsville called “In Florida, a Revival That Came but Didn’t Go.”

mike-bickle

Mike Bickle (b. 1955), founder of the International House of Prayer (IHOP-KC); as father of the “prophetic movement,” he was responsible for bringing the Kansas City prophets to notoriety within the Vineyard and rejuvenated “prophetic ministry” with words of knowledge in charismatic churches. In 1996, he published Growing in the Prophetic, which provides guidance for such a ministry to be used in a church.

Paul Washer (b. 1961), founder of HeartCry Missionary Society, well known for his online sermon titled “Shocking Youth Message,” among others, and his soteriology books The Gospel’s Power and Message, The Gospel Call and True Conversion, and Gospel Assurance and Warnings. He is a strong preacher of holiness and lordship salvation, was influenced by Ravenhill, and due to his online influence, has brought a degree of true revival in the evangelical churches. Although he is a Southern Baptist, he is very Puritan about his emphasis on Biblical sanctification, the use of the law, the atonement, and has frequently pointed out the weaknesses that exist in his denomination. And although he occasionally preaches a Baptistic eternal security, and has some anti-charismatic views, Wesley would probably see him as a friend to all who truly love Christ.

Andrew Strom

Andrew Strom (b. 1971), founder of RevivalSchool.com, is an established Pentecostal revivalist from New Zealand. He is a student of revivals and was involved as a journalist in the prophetic movement for ten years. Andrew has been a much needed voice of spiritual discernment for Pentecostal and charismatic Christians. His focus is very similar to that of Leonard Ravenhill and Charles Finney: to preach repentance and Biblical holiness, but also to encourage the proper use of the miraculous gifts of the Spirit today. His videos on YouTube have had a far reaching impact in exposing kundalini manifestations in the New Apostolic Reformation (the prophetic movement); and his books, although controversial, are desperately needed, and we pray that you would be blessed by them: Kundalini Warning, True and False Revival, Why I Left the Prophetic Movement, The Sinner’s Prayer: Fact or Fiction?, and others. He also has some great sermons on video and audio and some on sermonindex.net.

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John Boruff (b. 1985), founder of WesleyGospel.com, is a husband, father, musician, and sometimes an open air preacher. He graduated from UNC Pembroke in 2008 with a B.A. in Philosophy and Religion and views himself as a Baptistic Pentecostal. As a Christian, he feels connected with all members of the body of Christ, but can identify the most with churches like Assemblies of God and IHOP-KC. In 2015, he published The Gospel of Jesus Christ with Kingsley Press, which is meant to be a Bible study for open air preaching. For his other writings, search articles on this site or see the E-Books section.

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