Antediluvians: The World Before Noah’s Flood: A Commentary on Genesis 1-6 – John Boruff

Genesis 1 – This chapter can be summarized by verse 31: “God saw every thing that He had made, and, behold, it was very good. And the evening and the morning were the sixth day.” It took six days for God to create the world and everything in it. The creation of mankind was His crowning achievement, having made them in His own image (v. 27). There is not one suggestion in this chapter that God used millions of years nor Darwinistic evolution to create the world.

Genesis 2 – To further counter the idea of Darwinistic evolution, it specifically says how God made Adam and Eve, the first people: 1. Adam was made from the dust of the ground (v. 7). 2. Eve was made from Adam’s rib (v. 22). Darwinism says something totally different: that, over the course of millions of years, smaller animals changed into larger animals, and a certain kind of monkey changed into a Neanderthal (cave man), and then into the first man called Homo sapiens. This idea also contradicts verse 19, which says that God created all animals directly from the ground. There is no evolutionary concept in this chapter of a slow, gradual progression from one kind of animal changing into another, eventually resulting in humans. Such an idea was invented in Charles Darwin’s imagination, and published in On the Origin of Species (1859) and The Descent of Man (1871); it is now the origins myth of all secular school systems today, and embraced as a scientific fact, despite the clear testimony of Scripture. See Jonathan Sarfati’s Refuting Evolution I and II.

Genesis 3 – Here is described the fall of Adam and Eve (or their natures) into sin. Satan, in the form of a demonized lizard, perhaps a dragon, or a small four legged dinosaur (maybe something like a Tanystropheus), speaks to Eve within view of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. There has been much speculation about what kind of fruit this was, but suffice it to say, that God had placed a curse of sin and death on it for disobedience. Satan convinced Eve that God was trying to keep her from knowing as much as He did, so she was persuaded to eat it, not only because it looked like it would taste good, but because she thought it might give her more intelligence. Perhaps this fruit had some psychological properties (a drug), because it had a direct effect on her mind, as she immediately realized that she was naked, and was ashamed of it. God punished the demonized lizard by removing its legs and turning it into a snake (the reverse of evolution if anything), thus serving as a symbolic memorial for all time of the wicked vehicle through which mankind fell: even though it is the wisest of all land animals, it would have to be considered the lowest and most humiliated: despised by man, licking the dust of the ground all its days because of what it did. Observe that the snake is often used as a symbol of paganism and witchcraft: as if the devil still intends to use this to symbolize rebellion against God. There was also the tree of life in the Garden of Eden, then guarded by angels with flaming swords, but now swept away by the flood of Noah, the fruit of which imparted immortality; this was previously located in Iraq, most likely where the Tigris and Euphrates rivers converge by the town of Al-Qurnah. Local folklore holds that this is the original site of the Garden of Eden; and they even have a park there for what is called Adam’s Tree, in which they believe it to still contain the six thousand year old tree of knowledge: it is a jujube or date tree. Whether or not this is really that tree is beside the point: what is true is that Moses identified Eden with that place where the Tigris (Hiddekel in KJV) and the Euphrates intersected (2:10-15).

Genesis 4 – Without going into specifics, it is apparent that Abel’s relationship with God was good, but Cain’s was bad (Josephus, Ant. 2.1): hence the reason for God rejecting his sacrifice; and the reason why Cain so quickly burned with jealousy and hatred and murdered Abel even after hearing the voice of God! But the grace of God is shown in this: that although Cain was punished to wander into the land of Nod, and to never see his parents again, he was given a mark so that no man would kill him. Adam and Eve also had daughters (Josephus, Ant. 2.1), and so God provided him with a wife and a son named Enoch, not to be confused with the prophet Enoch who was seven generations removed from Adam, and descended from Seth (5:18-24). It is assumed that the world had been somewhat populated by now, because there were other towns with people in them, so this must have happened about 130 years after the events in Genesis 2 and 3: because Adam had already lived that many years when Eve conceived Seth in the place of Abel (5:3); this was plenty of time for other adults to procreate an adult wife for Cain to marry in Nod, a city that he built, but continued an evil life, being greedy and robbing people; he also built a city called Enoch, named after his eldest (Josephus, Ant. 2.2). Of course, all were “inbreeding” in those days, since everyone came from Adam and Eve, and there were no laws against it. Seth named his son Enos, and it was then that men began to “call upon the name of the Lord” (v. 26), bringing a revival probably through Seth (Josephus, Ant. 2.3), now that he was a grown man, and the eventual ancestor of Enoch and Noah. It seems that this was the first revival in history after the fall of Adam and Eve.

Genesis 5 – It is astonishing that so many men had lived for hundreds of years before dying! Young earth creationists explain this by saying that human bodies were in prime condition in those times, excluding the thousands of years of genetic defects that would eventually crop up in the human race and shorten lives; also, they say, the oxygen level, the ozone layer, and the general atmosphere was much more conducive to life back then than it is today. This is evidenced by giant fossils of plants, insects, animals, and humans believed to have lived in “prehistoric” or “antediluvian” pre-flood times. For an in-depth treatment of the antediluvian world, see Henry Morris’ The Genesis Record.

Genesis 6 – The revival in 4:26 was short lived, as all revivals are; but by that time, the men who followed the Lord were called the “sons of God” just as Christian men are under the Gospel (1 John 3:1), for God becomes the Father of all who live by faith in Him. Some men were gigantic in these times (v. 4), but this is not necessarily because the “sons of God” were fallen angels breeding with women. It could simply be for the same reasons given in chapter 5: things were larger back then and lived longer, because the natural conditions were nearly perfect. However, an alternative view holds that the giants were larger than others because the “sons of God” were fallen angelic beings who impregnated women with giants, see Job 38:7 (see Josephus, Ant. 3.1; this was the main view of the ancient world; and it was believed that Noah disapproved of this interbreeding with demons). In Greek mythology, Zeus supposedly turned into a swan and seduced a woman named Leda into sexual relations. This interpretation finds expression in ch. 6 of The Book of Enoch. Also, it had been a long held belief in the Middle Ages that witches can have sexual relations with demons called incubi: this was so serious a subject that a whole chapter was spent on it in part 1, question 3 of Heinrich Kramer and Jacob Sprenger’s Malleus Maleficarum. But if we assume the “sons of God” were godly men, then as in the history of Israel, it was the seductions of pagan women that drew the hearts of these sons of God away from God; and they intermarried with the daughters of Cain, who was a murderer; and apparently his descendants were violent like he was, because the whole earth was filled with violence by the time of Noah, and for this reason, God decided to flood the world and only save Noah’s family in the ark.

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About John Boruff

John Boruff is the founder of WesleyGospel.com, a husband, father, and sometimes an open air preacher. He graduated from UNC Pembroke in 2008 with a B.A. in Philosophy and Religion and views himself as a Wesleyan-Arminian Reformed Pentecostal. As a Christian, he feels connected with all members of the body of Christ, but can identify the most with churches like the Assemblies of God and the Vineyard. In 2015, he released "The Gospel of Jesus Christ," which is meant to be a Bible study for open air preaching. For his other writings, search articles on this site or see the E-Books section.
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